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The Rambler :: blog

Thursday, July 08, 2004

Eh Eh Eh? 

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My new sister-in-law is about a bizillion times cooler than I am, so milady and I have been listening to her copy of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' Fever to Tell recently. And I for one am enjoying it immensely. I was quite relieved when I read the liner notes to see that Sonic Youth got a much deserved credit. Bits of this album sound exactly like how the follow up to Dirty might have sounded if SY had stopped taking themselves so seriously for a moment. There's even that trademark dissonant guitar slide at one point. Great stuff.

But this is all old news. What I actually wanted to write about was something rather more disturbing in the sleevenotes - the following disclaimer, which must be everywhere, but this is the first time I've seen it:

"Whilst every effort has been taken to ensure that the elements of this product are free from any defects and faults including computer viruses Polydor Ltd (UK) and its licensees do not take any responsibility for the same. Use of this product is entirely at the user's risk."

Now, to me this sounds like Ford attaching a disclaimer to their new cars stating that if the brakes don't work when you first take it out, don't come running to us. Or Express Dairies absolving all responsibility if their milk poisons you. Now, certainly there might be times when it's not Polydor's fault - someone could switch CDs before they get sold to you, say - but are they really able to absolve themselves of all responsibility like this? What if an unscrupulous (fictional) Polydor employee started burning viruses on the production line? Would we have no recourse? This all seems slightly fishy, but then, what do I know? I just want to listen to the music, if that's OK, but can I afford to take that risk ...?


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